No Outsiders

No Outsiders

No Outsiders is an LGBT-inclusive education programme for primary school children. It is authored by assistant head teacher Andrew Moffat, who has been awarded an MBE for services to equality and diversity in education.

Moffat’s book, No Outsiders in Our Schools: Teaching the Equality Act in Primary Schools, misrepresents the Equality Act by replacing “sex” with “gender” and “gender reassignment” with “gender identity”.

No Outsiders page 26
No Outsiders in Our Schools: Teaching the Equality Act in Primary Schools, page 26

NB: There is no requirement at all to “teach” the Equality Act so the basis for this programme is flawed.

Moffat states that No Outsiders began as:

a project that ran from 2006 to 2008, supporting primary school teachers to develop strategies to address lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender equality in primary schools. The “no outsiders” project was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and paved the way for this resource.

The ESRC is part of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), a non-departmental public body funded by a grant-in-aid from the UK government. Transgender Trend reports:

The No Outsiders project began life in September 2006 at the University of Sunderland, led by Dr Elizabeth Atkinson and Dr Renee DePalma, with a grant of £575,435.85. It ended in December 2008. In addition to the academic staff 26 practitioner-researchers were recruited, working in 16 English primary schools.

https://www.transgendertrend.com/no-outsiders-queering-primary-classroom/

In February 2019, Pink News reported: “Ofsted chief inspector Amanda Spielman, who heads the government’s education watchdog, expressed support for Moffat and reaffirmed the importance of inclusive education in primary schools in an interview with the BBC…

“Education Secretary Damian Hinds congratulated Moffat… ‘I wish him the best of luck for the final. This is also another appropriate moment to thank all our teachers for their dedication and exceptional work, day after day, for our children and our society, in their unique role.'”

Books used in the No Outsiders programme include My Princess Boy, King and King, Mummy, Mama and Me, And Tango Makes Three and Julian Is a Mermaid. This video highlights concerns regarding the books.

Transgender Trend analysed the curriculum extensively in an article entitled No Outsiders: Queering the Primary Classroom. Extracts of the findings are presented below.

Parental concerns

The parent led revolt over the teaching of the No Outsiders programme at Parkfield Community School, a Birmingham primary with a 98% Muslim intake, shows no sign of going away. At least five schools in the area which had been teaching the programme have now, like Parkfield, suspended it while consultations take place with parents. The protests are said to have spread to other cities, with Muslim parents saying they do not want their primary school children to be taught about LGBT issues.

Quoted in the Birmingham Mail in February Mariam Ahmed, who has two children at the school, said: ‘My little girl is four, she’s in reception and she came home asking me if it’s ok to be a boy instead of a girl, and has dressed up in her brother’s clothes. She is four years old.’ Another parent, Fatima Shah, mother of two who has been prominent in the campaign said of her 10-year-old daughter: ‘My child came home and told me am I OK to be a boy? 

Misrepresenting the Equality Act

Parkfield school has a signing in system. It’s electronic and there’s a photo of it in the No Outsiders booklet.

Again, the actual 9 characteristics of the Equality Act have been confused and renamed, Sex has become Gender and Gender Reassignment has become Transgender identity. There are 6 posters around the school’s outside perimeter, with the same message, the same false reading of the Equality Act, the same promotion of ideas of gender identity.

There are five books with corresponding lesson plans for each year group. Moffat says he’s not connected the lesson plans directly with the 9 characteristics of the Equality Act. He advises that while some books specifically support the LGBT strand, all the books can be used to ‘celebrate diversity in all its forms.’
But surely there should be some link between the stated intention that No Outsiders is a teaching resource about the 2010 Equality Act and the actual lesson plans themselves?

The question of why the Equality Act was chosen by Andrew Moffat as a vehicle for his teaching programme remains. There is no legal requirement to teach it in the way that Moffat has chosen. The framework of the 9 protected characteristics is cumbersome. The suspicion must be that he is using the cover of the Equality Act to teach what is his main interest, LGBT, and within that, gender identity.

In Chapter 6 of No Outsiders in Our Schools: Teaching the Equality Act in Primary Schools, Moffat describes visiting the school of rugby player Gareth Thomas:

When Thomas told a whole school assembly that he was also gay, Moffat recounts:

“Great – gay people are welcome in our school! There was one audible gasp from a child in year 6 but otherwise there was no reaction at all, which was quite nice as it demonstrated to the shocked child that he was alone in his reaction; his homophobia made him the outsider.”

Origins of the project

The No Outsiders project began life in September 2006 at the University of Sunderland, led by Dr Elizabeth Atkinson and Dr Renee DePalma, with a grant of £575,435.85. It ended in December 2008… This screenshot gives a flavour of the published work.

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